Naas Hospital has 20 patients with Covid-19, new figures reveal

Senan Hogan

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Senan Hogan

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editor@kildarepost.com

Naas Hospital has 20 patients with Covid-19, new figures reveal

A sign thanking healthcare staff outside Naas Hospital this week

The number of patients with Covid-19 in Naas Hospital has reached 20, according to HSE figures. The hospital is 11th in a list of hospitals with the most coronavirus cases.

There are currently two patients in the Intensive Care Unit in Naas — compared to between 10 and 20 in ICU facilities in some Dublin hospitals.

This latest data, which was collected up to Saturday and released on Sunday, also shows that Naas Hospital has a further 20 patients showing Covid-19 symptoms but are awaiting test results.

Coo Kildare currently has the third-highest number of cases of all counties with 175, according to figures released last night.

A significant jump of 33 new cases was recorded between Wednesday and Thursday last week.

Up to last evening, Dublin has the most cases overall at 2,692 followed by Cork (362) in second place and Wicklow (142) in fourth place after Kildare. 

The data released on Sunday also showed that Naas had 100 vacant acute beds while it had just one ICU bed available.

In terms of hospitals, Beaumont in Dublin has the most Covid-19 cases on site at 110 followed by other hospitals in the capital such as St James' (83), the Mater (76), Tallaght (72), St Vincent's (68) and Connolly (54).

Hospital locations outside Dublin with Covid-19 cases include: Cavan (33), Letterkenny (27), Limerick (25), Drogheda (24), Naas (20), Cork University Hospital (19) and Galway University Hospital (18).

Capacity


The HSE said on Monday that the capacity to test for the coronavirus will be doubled from this week, to around 4,500 tests a day.
A network of laboratories and 50 community test centres have been set up across the country.
An ‘Isolation Assessment Unit’ has been set up in recent days in the car park of Naas Hospital.
The HSE also said it has managed to secure a supply of reagent, which is a crucial component in the testing process, despite a global shortage.
A German supplier is also now testing around 2,000 tests from Ireland a day.
Public health doctors have warned the next seven days are crucial to reduce the peak of the virus.
They have reiterated their call for people to stay at home where possible and to self-isolate if they display any symptoms.
In an update issued yesterday afternoon, the Dublin Midlands Hospital Group (DMHG) which covers County Kildare, commended local healthcare staff for their heroic efforts during the current crisis.
The DMHG also said people observing strict Covid-19 restrictions has saved lives and have given health services in the area vital time to prepare.

Temporary transfer 


The officials said two services have been temporarily transferred from Naas Hospital to the nearby Vista Primary Care in Naas.
These are the Oncology Haematology Day Services and the Warfarin clinic.


DMHG CEO Trevor O’Callaghan said: “Every effort has been made prior to this virus arriving in Ireland to ensure that we would be as ready as we could be in the circumstances and in the best possible position to protect and safeguard public health.”

Public Health Medicine specialist Dr Ruth McDermott said: “Staying at home will help us all to slow the spread of the virus, and that is giving us the opportunity to prepare all parts of the service.”

Here is the full statement from the HSE Dublin South, Kildare & West Wicklow Community Healthcare and Dublin Midlands Hospital Group

HSE management across the Hospitals and community services today issued a message of thanks to the people living in the community for their support of staff during the current crisis.

Management from HSE Dublin South, Kildare & West Wicklow Community Healthcare, the Dublin Midlands Hospital Group, the Department of Public Health and the National Ambulance Service said the action of the people of Ireland in recent weeks will save lives, and have given services in the area vital time to prepare.

CEO of the Dublin Midlands Hospital Group Trevor O’Callaghan said: “We thank and commend all our staff for their incredible efforts at this time. They have already gone above and beyond the call of duty as our health service faces extraordinary demands. I am immensely proud of all our staff as they rise to meet the unprecedented challenge posed by Covid-19. I want to thank all staff for the inspiring work being carried out in making advanced preparations. Every effort has been made prior to this virus arriving in Ireland to ensure that we would be as ready as we could be in the circumstances and in the best possible position to protect and safeguard public health.

An area Crisis Management Team with representatives of all HSE services has been meeting several times a week since early February to put in place extensive preparations for the impact of Covid-19 on services. To date, these preparations have included:

·       Increasing bed capacity across the entire healthcare system in order to facilitate additional ICU beds, acute beds, transitional and step-down care. This includes working with private hospitals and HSE Long Term Care Facilities.

·       Establishing a Self-Isolation Centre at City West.

·       COVID19 Community Testing sites have been established in Lucan (Co. Dublin), Tallaght (Dublin 24), Sir John Rogersons Quay (Dublin 2) and Newbridge (Co, Kildare). These sites are by appointment only. If you have symptoms of COVID19 contact your GP by telephone in the first instance. Your GP will decide if you fall into the category for testing.  

·       Supporting community response forums set up by local authorities.

·       Planning to provide 4 community assessment hubs, which will begin to open by the end of this week. These facilities will allow General Practitioners (GPs) to refer members of the public with Covid-19 for a medical examination.

·       Working with private hospitals and HSE Long Term Care Facilities to increase bed capacity in the acute hospital system and ensuring critical services continue to be provided.

·       Oncology Haematology Day Services at Naas General Hospital has temporarily relocated to Express Centre in Affidea, Vista Primary Care, Naas.

·       Warfarin clinic from Naas General Hospital has temporarily moved to Affidea in Vista Primary Care Centre, Naas.

·       Temporarily relocating the Oncology Day Ward at Tallaght University Hospital  temporarily to the HSE Intergraded Academic Primary Care Centre, Tallaght Cross.

·       Visiting restrictions remain in place across all Hospitals and long term care facilities. Any updates will be included on the HSE website and can be viewed here

·       A recruitment campaign has been launched for all healthcare staff, including student nurses and midwives, across our Hospitals. You can view the ad on HSE LinkedIn or on the following twitter @DMHospitalGroup or visit here

·       A Healthcare Staff recruitment campaign in on-going across the HSE https://www.hse.ie/eng/ services/news/newsfeatures/ covid19-updates/oncall/

 

Chief Officer of HSE Dublin South, Kildare & West Wicklow Community Healthcare, Ann O’Shea, who chairs the HSE’s area crisis management team said:

“We have seen a huge redeployment of staff across our services, and our staff have risen to this challenge as they move to screening centres; returned to clinical duties and increase their working hours where they can. Their efforts will help us to provide care for the people of Dublin South, Kildare & West Wicklow Community Healthcare.

“We thank the people of Dublin South, Kildare & West Wicklow Community Healthcare for their support at this time. That support takes many different forms, and it means so much to our hard-working staff. In particular, we want to thank everyone who has helped a healthcare worker with childcare, as every extra hour that you can facilitate a staff member to work is a huge help.”

With visiting restrictions in place at all hospitals and residential centres, staff are doing everything possible to support patients and residents and to help them keep in contact with relatives and friends. We know that visiting restrictions are very difficult, and that some people have not been able to see their loved ones for many weeks now. Our staff are doing everything possible to make sure all patients and residents are kept safe and well.

Most importantly, we are still providing vital services and we are still here for the people of Dublin South, Kildare & West Wicklow.”

Specialist is Public Health Medicine Dr Ruth McDermott, thanked the people of Dublin South, Kildare & West Wicklow for adhering to guidelines and staying at home as much as possible.

“Staying at home will help us all to slow the spread of the virus, and that is giving us the opportunity to prepare all parts of the service. We would like to remind you that when you leave your home for essential reasons, that you continue to keep two metres apart from anyone not in your household. Also, please maintain regular hand washing, regular cleaning of surface and always remember to catch your coughs and colds. It’s more important now than ever,”

Emergency Services continue as normal and are open 24/7 for people who are seriously ill or injured and if their life is at risk. Stroke and heart attacks are life-threatening medical emergencies. If you or someone else is showing signs of a stroke or heart attack, don’t wait, call 999.