German and UK police give different identities for alleged €800,000 Curragh drugs accused

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Paul O'Meara

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Paul O'Meara

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German and UK police give different identities for alleged €800,000 Curragh drugs accused

Naas courthouse

International police authorities have come up with two different names and dates of birth for an alleged suspect in the Curragh drugs find.

A male, said to be 16 years old during a Naas District Court hearing on November 4, made an unscheduled appearance before the same court this afternoon.

On that occasion he was remanded to the Oberstown Children Detention Campus because of his age.

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He faces allegations of having cannabis for the purpose of sale or supply at Ballysax, Curragh, on November 3.

Sgt Brian Jacob told the court he was seeking a remand in custody to a prison instead.

“We don’t believe he’s a juvenile,” he said

Det Sgt Hugh McInerney of the Garda National Drugs and Organised Crime Bureau said fingerprints taken from the defendant were provided to Interpol to try to establish his identity and the German authorities had details of the fingerprints associated with Tran Khanh Duc who was born in 1993.

He said they also provided a photograph taken in 2012.

He also said that the fingerprints provided also matched Sung Nguyen, who was born in 1996 and has an address in Leeds.

He said they were still awaiting further information from Interpol. He added that the gardaí are trying to establish if the defendant has any identification like a passport and the Vietnamese authorities are being contacted.

Defending solicitor Mark Murphy told the court that the defendant is standing by the original identity and his 2003 date of birth, which differs from either given by Interpol.

Mr Murphy also said the defendant, who had proceedings translated by a Vietnamese interpreter, does not want to give evidence.

He did not know if he is an Irish citizen.

Judge Zaidan said he was prepared to accept the garda evidence, which was not challenged.

“I accept he’s not 16,” he said.

He remanded the defendant in custody to prison and changed his name and date of birth on court documents to the information provided by German officials.